Planning for 2018 Center for Cistercian and Monastic Studies Conference

Last week’s conference included a fine slate of papers as well as good company and wonderful weather.  We can’t thank our panel organizers, paper presenters and session presiders enough for their work!

Now it’s time to plan for 2018 CCMS!  As you may remember, some of the CCMS panels are also ICMS panels, so our submission schedule closely adheres to the schedule for the International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University.

Deadlines:

Panel proposals

May 26, 2017 (Friday) by noon – Panel Recommendations to mdvl_ccms@wmich.edu so the Conference Steering committee (Marvin Döbler, Hugh Feiss, Anne Lester, Stefano Mula) can prepare submissions.

Recommendations should include:  Title, name and contact information for the person organizing the panel, one-page (250-400 words) intellectual justification for the session (significance, why now?, potential participants can also be included).  Only the organizer must be committed to the session at this time.

Paper Proposals

September 15 –Deadline for paper submissions to panel organizers from ICMS call for papers or for CCMS sessions from blog, deadline for paper abstracts to CCMS portion of the conference to mdvl_ccms@wmich.edu for consideration by the steering committee.

Our process

The submissions for CCMS are approved by the CCMS conference steering committee, so the deadlines are slightly different than those for the International Congress on Medieval Studies.  Additionally, CCMS welcomes proposals on any facet of monasticism in any historical period, not only the middle ages.

As always, questions can be sent to our email address, mdvl_ccms@wmich.edu.  If you would like to be added to our mailing list, please fill out this form.

 

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Call for Papers, Conference On Cistercian and Monastic Studies, 2017

Call for Papers

Conference on Cistercian and Monastic Studies

Western Michigan University

May 11-14, 2017

The Conference on Cistercian and Monastic Studies invites papers for its annual meeting, which is held concurrently with the International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS).[1]  While papers which fit into the themes below are encouraged, all papers on Cistercian Studies or, more broadly, monastic studies, which cover any time period will be seriously considered for the conference.

Cistercian Abbeys of Brittany

Cistercian Liturgy and History

Cistercian Manuscripts Lost and Found

Cistercian Saints’ Lives and Exempla: Historical Sources?

Issues in Cistercian and Monastic Studies

Memory and Memory Aids in 12th Century Cistercian Writing

Monks and the World:  The Political and Economic Activities of Medieval Cistercian Monasteries

Pseudo-Bernard: The Writers, Works, and Readers

Teaching Monasticism in the Academy and the Abbey

The Cistercian and Monastic Inspiration for the Reformation, On Occasion of the 500th Anniversary of Luther’s Theses

The Influence of Cistercian Writing on Vernacular Authors

The Intersection of Material and Spiritual Culture in Medieval Monasticism

Address questions to the Center for Cistercian and Monastic Studies (mdvl_ccms@wmich.edu).  Send abstracts and participant information forms (http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to the same email address by September 1, 2016 for full consideration.

[1] Some sessions are a part of the ICMS program, while others are exclusively a part of the Cistercian Conference.  Organizers cannot guarantee that a participant’s paper will be a part of the ICMS program.

2017 Conference Planning update; sessions submitted to International Congress on Medieval Studies

963951_10200693545834750_1031358324_oThe response to our call for session proposals was wonderful!  We received 12 proposals, which is the maximum number we can submit and the CCMS Advisory Board was very pleased with the thoughtfulness and quality of the proposals.  The application was submitted to ICMS yesterday.  Now we will await the decision of their committee.  Thanks to everyone for their work!

Listed below are the titles we submitted.  More information will be forthcoming once we hear from ICMS, which will be several weeks from now.  In the meantime, please consider whether you would like to submit a paper to one of these sessions, or volunteer to help organize or chair.  We want to encourage everyone to be involved.

Cistercian Liturgy and History

Cistercian Manuscripts Lost and Found

The Influence of Cistercian Writing on Vernacular Authors

Cistercian Saints’ Lives and Exempla: Historical Sources?

The Intersection of Material and Spiritual Culture in Medieval Monasticism

Cistercian Abbeys of Brittany

Memory and Memory Aids in 12th Century Cistercian Writing

Monks and the World:  The Political and Economic Activities of Medieval Cistercian Monasteries

Pseudo-Bernard: The Writers, Works, and Readers

The Cistercian and Monastic Inspiration for the Reformation, On Occasion of the 500th Anniversary of Luther’s Theses

Issues in Cistercian and Monastic Studies

Teaching Monasticism in the Academy and the Abbey

Please do contact me with any questions or comments at the Center’s email address, mdvl_ccms@wmich.edu.

Sue Steuer, Interim Director

 

 

 

2017 Conference Planning

As outlined in the previous post, the Conference on Cistercian and Monastic Studies will be adapting its planning process this year.  The goal of these changes is to work more efficiently within the existing process of the International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS), while retaining the stature of the Conference (CCMS) as a distinct international academic gathering.  The link below leads to a brief document which outlines the process as it is currently envisioned.  This does not mean that we will not need to adapt to developments as we work with these changes, but it provides us with a place to start.

The most significant change is that we are asking our regular attenders to come up with some topics and brief rationales for sessions they would like to develop and serve as organizers.  These sessions will be discussed by the CCMS advisory board submitted for inclusion in 2017 ICMS.  Some sessions outside of ICMS are also anticipated.

Planning process: 2017 Conference on Cistercian and Monastic Studies

Please do contact the office if you have any questions at mdvl_ccms@wmich.edu.  Our phone is only covered intermittently at this time, so email is the best way to reach someone.

Awaiting the Cistercians and Medievalists

The most recent work encompassing all Cistercian foundations is that of Leopold Janauschek, published in 1877,

The most recent work encompassing all Cistercian foundations is that of Leopold Janauschek, published in 1877.

As we await the arrival of our Cistercian and medievalist guests, who will begin arriving next week, I have been looking at where we planned to be at this point last year.

The good news is that we’ve completed spreadsheets for all of the Cistercian monasteries in Laurent Cottineau, Repertoire topo-bibliographique des abbayes et prieurés (Macon, 1939) and Leopold Janauschek, Originum Cisterciensium Tomus I in quo praemissis congregationum domiciliis adjectisque tabulis chronologico-genealogicis veterum abbatiarum a monachis habitatarum fundationes ad fidem antiquissimorum fontium primus descripsit, (Vindobonae 1877). We have also created spreadsheets for modern foundations up to the present.  Graduate Students Marca (Mary Caroline) Hoyle and Vajra Regan have spent the long, cold winter months filling in cells and checking work and now we are ready to distribute them to specialists on Cistercians in particular regions to update and correct based upon their expertise at the congress.  Other aspects of the project, such as mapping and data mining, await funding before they can begin.  We have applied for a National Endowment for the Humanities Digital Implementation Grant to support this project through its full development.  We’re working on the best method to allow everyone to participate in working with this material, considering Google+ or other collaborative workspace and suggestions are welcome.

We’ve also embarked on a new project, The Janauschek Portal Wiki (https://www.wmich.edu/janauschek/wiki/index.php/Main_Page).   Last year, we learned that Frank Sasama and Cornelia Oefelein were working to find a way to finish Dr. Janauschek’s work.  Janauaschek had planned a second volume of his work, which was to focus on foundations for women, and had also found references to additional houses in his ongoing research.  Dr. Sasama digitized Janauschek’s notes, held at at the Abbey of Heiligenkreuz.  After a great deal of research, it was decided that a wiki format would be the best way to allow scholars to consult the notes and participate in transcribing them.  The Originum Cisterciensium Liber Secundus:  An edition of the notes of Leopold Janauschek will be an important step in creating a comprehensive guide to the Cistercian Order from the middle ages to the present and will result in a new scholarly text edition.  Leopold Janauschek’s Originum Cisterciensium Liber Primus (Vienna, 1877) remains the most important reference work on the geographical spread of the Cistercian Order during its (then) 700-year history.  His intended Tomus secundus, a second volume on female houses, into which he planned to incorporate material discovered after publication of the first volume, was never completed.  This project will begin by transcribing Janauschek’s handwritten notes into a wiki.  The project is a collaboration between the Center for Cistercian and Monastic Studies at Western Michigan University and CistopediaCistopedia (www.cistopedia.org) was developed with the collaboration of both branches of the modern Cistercian Order and other Cistercian “family” and attracts participants from many groups:  Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox Christians, Cistercian monks and nuns from many countries and different observances, lay people and religious.   We have submitted a grant to the National Endowment for the Humanities Scholarly Editions and Translaitons program to support this work.   Our editorial board, including Rozanne Elder (WMU), Cornelia Oelefein (Chairman, Verein zur Förderung  einer “Europäischen Akademie für Cistercienserforschung (EAC)” im ehemaligen Kloster Lehnin e.V.), Frank Sasama (Member, EUCist – Europainstitut für CistercienserforschungEuropainstitut), and AlKuin Schachenmayr (Vizerektor der Hochschule, Stiftsbibliothekar und Stiftsarchivar Europainstitut für cisterciensiche Geschichte, Spiritualität, Kunst und Liturgie Mitglied des Institutes für Kirchengeschichte und Kirchenrecht) and Susan Steuer (WMU) is beginning to develop guidelines so that the transcription efforts of interested scholars can be organized to contribute to the wiki site.  We hope to have collaborators meet at a conference in Europe after two years to discuss the results of the project and its impact upon their individual research.  The Janauschek Portal is currently being populated with images.  We have uploaded about 900 of an estimated 14,000 images into the wiki since January, and we hope our speed will improve as we get the protocols fully established.   If you are interested in participating in this effort, please contact cistercian-scholarship@wmich.edu to get authorization and a personal login for the project.

The Medieval Congress and Beyond

Last Saturday, the Center for Cistercian and Monastic Studies and the WMU Libraries announced the gazetteer project to the attendees at the annual Cistercian Studies Conference in Kalamazoo, Michigan on May 11, 2013.  (A link to the powerpoint and data dictionary are posted at http://libguides.wmich.edu/speccoll under the Cistercian Studies tab).  We were delighted at the response from the community of scholars and look forward to working with interested parties as we move forward on this effort.   If you are interested in supporting this effort, a letter describing the help that this would be to your teaching and research, particularly in view of the history of Cistercian studies at WMU, would be appreciated.

We currently have two students, Jan Volek (Czech and German) and Peter Dobek (Polish and Spanish), who are working on data development.   We are also fleshing out the publications which will be digitized as a part of this effort and the features of the map and linking data.  It’s a very exciting time for the project and we’ll be posting further updates soon.